Adverse Effects of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors- Real World Use.
Thyroid World Congress ePoster Library. Kim S. 06/20/19; 272040; 106
Seok-Mo Kim
Seok-Mo Kim
Login now to access Regular content available to all registered users.

You may also access this content "anytime, anywhere" with the Free MULTILEARNING App for iOS and Android
Abstract
Rate & Comment (0)

Background

Kinase inhibitors are recommended for treating radioactive iodine (RAI)-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer patients that is not otherwise amenable to local control using alternative approaches. Although associated with a significant progression-free survival improvement as compared to placebo in a large Phase III study, the benefit of TKIs needs to be proved in the context of associated moderate to severe toxicities that require frequent dose reduction and delays.

 

Methods

Retrospective cohort study of medical records of 71 patients treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors lenvatinib and sorafenib for thyroid cancer at Gangnam Severance Hospital from July 2016 to December 2017 was conducted. Baseline clinical parameters, dosage and adverse effects from initiation of treatment were collected.

 

Results

As tyrosine kinase inhibitors, sorafenib (N=48) and lenvatinib (N=23) was used. Adverse effects occurred in 19 patients (82.6%), requiring dose reduction in 8 (34.8%) of patients and drug cessation in 1 patient (4.3%). For patients using sorafenib, the initial starting dose was £400mg daily in 12 patients (25.0%), 600mg in 16 patients (33.3%) and 800mg daily in 20 patients (41.7%). Dose reduction was needed for adverse effects in 27 patients (56.3%), and drug cessation was necessary in 4 patients (8.3%). When most common adverse effect was compared between sorafenib and lenvatinib, hand-foot-syndrome was significantly more frequent in patient using sorafenib (42 (87.5%) vs 13 (56.2%), p=0.003).

 

Discussion & Conclusion

Both of the TKIs showed high rate of adverse effect. Adverse effect was more observed in sorafenib patients, which needed more often drug cessation.

 

 


Background

Kinase inhibitors are recommended for treating radioactive iodine (RAI)-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer patients that is not otherwise amenable to local control using alternative approaches. Although associated with a significant progression-free survival improvement as compared to placebo in a large Phase III study, the benefit of TKIs needs to be proved in the context of associated moderate to severe toxicities that require frequent dose reduction and delays.

 

Methods

Retrospective cohort study of medical records of 71 patients treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors lenvatinib and sorafenib for thyroid cancer at Gangnam Severance Hospital from July 2016 to December 2017 was conducted. Baseline clinical parameters, dosage and adverse effects from initiation of treatment were collected.

 

Results

As tyrosine kinase inhibitors, sorafenib (N=48) and lenvatinib (N=23) was used. Adverse effects occurred in 19 patients (82.6%), requiring dose reduction in 8 (34.8%) of patients and drug cessation in 1 patient (4.3%). For patients using sorafenib, the initial starting dose was £400mg daily in 12 patients (25.0%), 600mg in 16 patients (33.3%) and 800mg daily in 20 patients (41.7%). Dose reduction was needed for adverse effects in 27 patients (56.3%), and drug cessation was necessary in 4 patients (8.3%). When most common adverse effect was compared between sorafenib and lenvatinib, hand-foot-syndrome was significantly more frequent in patient using sorafenib (42 (87.5%) vs 13 (56.2%), p=0.003).

 

Discussion & Conclusion

Both of the TKIs showed high rate of adverse effect. Adverse effect was more observed in sorafenib patients, which needed more often drug cessation.

 

 


    This eLearning portal is powered by:
    This eLearning portal is powered by MULTIEPORTAL
Anonymous User Privacy Preferences

Strictly Necessary Cookies (Always Active)

MULTILEARNING platforms and tools hereinafter referred as “MLG SOFTWARE” are provided to you as pure educational platforms/services requiring cookies to operate. In the case of the MLG SOFTWARE, cookies are essential for the Platform to function properly for the provision of education. If these cookies are disabled, a large subset of the functionality provided by the Platform will either be unavailable or cease to work as expected. The MLG SOFTWARE do not capture non-essential activities such as menu items and listings you click on or pages viewed.


Performance Cookies

Performance cookies are used to analyse how visitors use a website in order to provide a better user experience.


Save Settings