Obesity is positively, Tabaco smoking and alcohol consumption are negatively related with the risk of thyroid cancer: A nested case-control studies using a national health screening cohort
Thyroid World Congress ePoster Library. Choi H. 06/22/19; 272148; 164
Hyo Geun Choi
Hyo Geun Choi
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Abstract
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Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relation among smoking, drinking alcohol, and obesity with thyroid cancer in a Korean population.

Methods: The Korean National Health Insurance Service-Health Screening Cohort with ≥ 40 years old, was assessed from 2002 to 2013. In total, 4,977 thyroid cancer participants were matched with 19,908 controls at a ratio of 1:4 with respect to age, sex, income, region of residence, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. We analyzed previous histories of smoking (current smoker compared to nonsmoker or past smoker), alcohol consumption (≥1 time a week compared to drinking <1 time a week), and obesity (<18.5 [underweight], ≥18.5 to <23 [normal], ≥23 to <25 [overweight], ≥25 to <30 [obese I], and ≥30 [obese II]). Thyroid cancer was defined using ICD-10 code (C73) and thyroidectomy claim code. Crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were analyzed using conditional logistic regression analyses. 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated.

Results: The rate of smoking and alcohol consumption was lower in thyroid cancer than those in the control group. Thyroid cancer participants included more obese participants than control group. The adjusted OR of smoking for thyroid cancer was 0.62 (95%CI=0.54-0.72), and that of alcohol consumption was 0.87 (95%CI=0.80-0.94, P <0.001). The adjusted ORs of obesity was 0.75 (95%CI=0.57-0.99) for underweight; 1.09 (95%CI=1.00-1.18) for overweight; 1.14 (95%CI=1.06-1.24) for obese I; 1.26 (95%CI=1.06-1.50) for obese II.

Conclusion: The odds of smoking and alcohol consumption was decreased, and obesity was increased in thyroid cancer patient compared the control group. 

 


Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relation among smoking, drinking alcohol, and obesity with thyroid cancer in a Korean population.

Methods: The Korean National Health Insurance Service-Health Screening Cohort with ≥ 40 years old, was assessed from 2002 to 2013. In total, 4,977 thyroid cancer participants were matched with 19,908 controls at a ratio of 1:4 with respect to age, sex, income, region of residence, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. We analyzed previous histories of smoking (current smoker compared to nonsmoker or past smoker), alcohol consumption (≥1 time a week compared to drinking <1 time a week), and obesity (<18.5 [underweight], ≥18.5 to <23 [normal], ≥23 to <25 [overweight], ≥25 to <30 [obese I], and ≥30 [obese II]). Thyroid cancer was defined using ICD-10 code (C73) and thyroidectomy claim code. Crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were analyzed using conditional logistic regression analyses. 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated.

Results: The rate of smoking and alcohol consumption was lower in thyroid cancer than those in the control group. Thyroid cancer participants included more obese participants than control group. The adjusted OR of smoking for thyroid cancer was 0.62 (95%CI=0.54-0.72), and that of alcohol consumption was 0.87 (95%CI=0.80-0.94, P <0.001). The adjusted ORs of obesity was 0.75 (95%CI=0.57-0.99) for underweight; 1.09 (95%CI=1.00-1.18) for overweight; 1.14 (95%CI=1.06-1.24) for obese I; 1.26 (95%CI=1.06-1.50) for obese II.

Conclusion: The odds of smoking and alcohol consumption was decreased, and obesity was increased in thyroid cancer patient compared the control group. 

 


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